All the WebRTC infrastructure

for your Website, Android and iOS app

managed webrtc

Managed WebRTC is a complete infrastructure, which includes servers, services and client libraries you would otherwise need to bring together yourself

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WebRTC

If you are using a modern web browser, chances are WebRTC is already built-in, but the Android and iOS operating systems do not natively support WebRTC, means you need separate libraries and code to make it work in native apps.

While the WebRTC browser API includes everything to manage video streams between cameras and browser elements, it is up to you to orchestrate these streams and bind them to the UI elements.

elephant playing with debugger

WebRTC does not cover call signaling, which means you must write code to tell endpoints when and where to connect. You would typically use technologies like REST and socket.io for this task, with code spanning clients and servers.

You will also need to program workflows, like managing participants, invites, accepting and rejecting calls, besides authorizing and switching cameras and microphones.

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Managed WebRTC

We have created an SDK which makes use of the WebRTC APIs already built into web browsers, and we have ported this SDK to Android and iOS and bundled it with all the hardware-specific libraries you need.

With managed WebRTC, you do not need any WebRTC-specific knowledge, as you embed peer-to-peer video and chat just as you would embed a YouTube video.

happy elephant with keyboard and mouse

When using Managed WebRTC, we provide you with an embed which already contains all required code.

To connect your users, you specify a room and pass in the current user's avatar. As soon as two or more users are in the same room, these can see each other, and we transparently manage invites, call signaling and video streams.

all the webrtc infrastructure in a single server

Even though video is typically streamed directly between clients, you will need multiple servers with public IPs to ensure everything works smoothly. Besides the server for call signaling, you will also need STUN and TURN servers for punching holes through NATs and to mirror streams in the extreme case that clients can't see each other.

We have all this packaged for you into a fully managed server. Add as many instances as you need, and your embeds will automatically find them and magically connect your users.

While in beta, your first 256 MB server instance for up to 200 concurrent users is on us, forever.

symbol
WebRTC

If you are using a modern web browser, chances are WebRTC is already built-in, but the Android and iOS operating systems do not natively support WebRTC, means you need separate libraries and code to make it work in native apps.

While the WebRTC browser API includes everything to manage video streams between cameras and browser elements, it is up to you to orchestrate these streams and bind them to the UI elements.

managed webrtc
Managed WebRTC

We have created an SDK which makes use of the WebRTC APIs already built into web browsers, and we have ported this SDK to Android and iOS and bundled it with all the hardware-specific libraries you need.

With managed WebRTC, you do not need any WebRTC-specific knowledge, as you embed peer-to-peer video and chat just as you would embed a YouTube video.

elephant playing with debuggerWebRTC does not cover call signaling, which means you must write code to tell endpoints when and where to connect. You would typically use technologies like REST and socket.io for this task, with code spanning clients and servers.

You will also need to program workflows, like managing participants, invites, accepting and rejecting calls, besides authorizing and switching cameras and microphones.

happy elephant with keyboard and mouseWhen using Managed WebRTC, we provide you with an embed which already contains all required code.

To connect your users, you specify a room and pass in the current user's avatar. As soon as two or more users are in the same room, these can see each other, and we transparently manage invites, call signaling and video streams.

Even though video is typically streamed directly between clients, you will need multiple servers with public IPs to ensure everything works smoothly. Besides the server for call signaling, you will also need STUN and TURN servers for punching holes through NATs and to mirror streams in the extreme case that clients can't see each other.

all the webrtc infrastructure in a single server

We have all this packaged for you into a fully managed server. Add as many instances as you need, and your embeds will automatically find them and magically connect your users.

While in beta, your first 256 MB server instance for up to 200 concurrent users is on us, forever.

Please help us on our mission to make WebRTC as easy as placing an image. If your use case isn't covered, let's talk.Feedback

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